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Condensed from Real Simple magazine by Abigail Wise

Some lucky people are actually born with personalities that make them worry less, but what about the rest of us? The good news is there are proven ways to combat too much stress and its harmful effects on our bodies and minds. Don’t sweat it! You can adopt some of these simple stress busters, too.

Take a look at this list and then click the image to view the video. Sorry about the ads.

  1. They meditate. 
  2. They work out regularly
  3. They spend the outdoors
  4. They leave work
  5. They take their vacation days
  6. They read for fun
  7. They get enough sleep

 

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Stressing & Relaxing

oldfashioned-treadmill

From Mental Floss

Exercising on a treadmill can often feel like torture and that’s not a coincidence. 

In 1818, an English civil engineer named Sir William Cubitt devised a machine called the “tread-wheel” to reform stubborn and idle convicts.

Prisoners would step on the 24 spokes of a large paddle wheel, climbing it like a modern StairMaster. As the spokes turned, the gears were used to pump water or crush grain. Hence the eventual name treadmill. Read more…

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EXERCISE

exercise1post

 

From evidence gathered by Monique Tello, MD, MPH for the Harvard Health blog.

If our jobs require us to be at a desk or behind the wheel for long periods of time, are we destined to die earlier than our fellow landscapers, baristas, and construction workers? Should we all quit and seek an occupation that will allow us to stand all day? 

No suggests a study that found that 60 to 75 minutes of moderate physical activity like walking to work, walking the dog or riding a stationary bike can  eliminate the risk of death related to sitting, even from sitting for more than eight hours a day.

We know it’s hard to find the time. Thankfully studies have found that just 25 minutes of moderate activity is somewhat protective.

Wonder what constitutes moderate and vigorous activity? The CDC published a table describing many activities include running, soccer, backpacking, bicycling on hilly terrain, spinning or step classes, karate, and judo.

Can’t resist watching endless hours of television? Consider buying an exercise bike or a treadmill, and place it squarely in front of the screen.

In any case, find a sport or active hobby that you enjoy; do as much, or as little as you can, because quite simply your life could be depending on it.

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EXERCISE