screen-shot-2017-09-17-at-3-51-55-pmA new  University of Colorado School of Medicine study estimates thousands of U.S. lives could be saved if mammograms were done every year from age 40 to 84.

A computer modeling to assess the three major mammogram recommendations was done: annual screening from age 40 to 84; annual screening at ages 45 to 54, then every other year from 55 to 79; or every other year from 50 to 74.

Study co-author R. Edward Hendrick says, “We know that screening mammography saves lives, what’s still a mystery is how many breast cancer deaths are averted by screening mammography and appropriate treatment.”

The researchers estimated how many lives would be saved if every U.S. woman born in 1960 followed one of the three above recommendations each year.

Deaths from breast cancer would fall by an average of 40 percent with annual screenings from 40 to 84, the investigators reported.

By comparison, breast cancer mortality would decline 31 percent with screening until age 79. And it would drop 23 percent with every-other-year mammography from 50 to 74, which is recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

The number of lives saved from breast cancer would be about 29,400 with annual screening from age 40 to 84; and about 22,800 and 17,200, respectively, for the other two recommendations, the researchers found.

Currently, only about half of women over 40 get mammogram screening at least once every two years, even though one in eight is expected to develop breast cancer in their lives, Hendrick said.

Of course, false positive results that require additional and unnecessary screening remain a concern. But, according to Hendrick, “the average woman in her 40s getting annual screening can expect this to occur about once every 12 years.”

As usual, there is still controversy from these findings. Chec with your health professional to determine your next steps, according to your individual family health history. Your guidelines may even be earlier than 40.

 

 

screen-shot-2017-09-02-at-10-05-55-pm

From The American Lung Association http://www.lung.org

Sometimes we take our lungs for granted. They keep us alive and well and for the most part, we don’t need to think about them. That’s why it is important to prioritize your lung health.

Don’t Smoke Cigarette smoking is the major cause of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. If you smoke, it’s never too late to benefit from quitting.

Avoid Exposure to Pollutants That Can Damage Your Lungs Secondhand smoke, outdoor air pollution, chemicals in the home and workplace, and radon all can cause or worsen lung disease. Make your home and car smokefree. Test your home for radon.

Prevent Infection A cold or other respiratory infection can sometimes become very serious. There are several things you can do to protect yourself. Read more 

Get Regular Healthcare Regular check-ups help prevent diseases, even when you are feeling well. This is especially true for lung disease, which sometimes goes undetected until it is serious.

Exercise Aerobic exercise helps improve your lung capacity. Specific breathing exercises can also help improve your lung function. Exercise and breathing techniques are also great for improving your mood and helping you relax.

 

chocolatebrain

Condensed from an article by Robert H. Shmerling. MD., Harvard Health Publications

It’s true, at least according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Of course, that could be a coincidence. But is it possible that intelligence or other measures of high brain function are actually improved by the consumption of chocolate? A new review summarizes the evidence and concludes with a resounding “maybe.” Read more:

 

screen-shot-2017-08-05-at-12-02-00-pm

Back to
YOUR TESTICLES

screen-shot-2017-08-05-at-12-02-00-pm

                                                                   Image: Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Canada


Back to
YOUR PROSTATE

screen-shot-2017-08-05-at-11-42-49-am

 

Condensed from CDC.gov

Clothing When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection.

A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors.

Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor. If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.

Hat For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck.

A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15, or by staying in the shade.

 

Back to
SUN SAFETY

burgersodafat
                                                             Cozy Burger by Phil Ferguson 

Condensed from U.S. News ~ Dennis Thompson reporting

Combining a sugary soda with your burger or fried chicken (please think twice about eating these too) can prime your body to pack on more pounds, a new study by lead researcher Shanon Casperson of the U.S. Department of Agriculture found.

Folks who had a sweetened drink with a high-protein meal stored more unused fat, compared to others who ate the same food with a sugar-free beverage, laboratory tests revealed. Their bodies did not burn about a third of the additional calories provided by the sugary drink.

Sodas, sweetened coffee and iced tea drinks, fruit drinks, energy beverages and the like are leading sources of added sugar in the American diet, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Six in 10 kids and half of adults drink at least one sugary beverage each day!

 

Back to
EAT HEALTHY

Condensed from the American Heart Association News

Children are far more likely than adults to get headaches when having a stroke, a new study suggests.

Stroke should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child with a headache and additional symptoms of weakness or numbness (in the face, arm or leg) or changes in walking, talking or vision,” said Lori L. Billinghurst, M.D., M.Sc., clinical assistant professor of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. “Urgent brain imaging may be required to distinguish a migraine with aura from a stroke.”

Please read more

 

Back to
HEART DISEASE

Condensed from the CDC website

Protecting your preteen children from most of the cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the thing to do. HPV is a very common virus that spreads between people when they have sexual contact with another person. About 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year. HPV infection can cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in women and penile cancer in men. HPV can also cause anal cancer, throat cancer, and genital warts in both men and women.

The HPV vaccine is recommended for preteen boys and girls at age 11 or 12 so they are protected before ever being exposed to the virus. HPV vaccine also produces a higher immune response in preteens than in older adolescents. 

HPV vaccination is a series of shots given over several months. The best way to remember to get your child all of the shots they need is to make an appointment for the remaining shots before you leave the doctor’s office or clinic. 

HPV vaccines have been studied very carefully. These studies showed no serious safety concerns. Common, mild adverse events (side effects) reported during these studies include pain in the arm where the shot was given, fever, dizziness and nausea.

If your preteen hasn’t gotten the vaccine yet, talk to their doctor about getting it for them as soon as possible. This one is really important.

 

Back to
SAFER SEX

screen-shot-2017-06-24-at-11-10-29-pm

 

People who eat a high fiber diet are less likely to die of any cause, a study of nearly one million people has found.

  • The benefits of consuming fiber-rich foods have been known for decades, including lowering of blood cholesterol, blood pressure, blood glucose and insulin, and possibly reducing inflammation.
  • High-fiber foods may also make people feel full sooner, and for longer, which helps curb overeating and weight gain.
  • Eight studies showed a 10 percent drop in risk for any cause of death with each 10-gram per day increase in fiber intake. This can come from two servings of whole grain foods, such as breakfast cereal and two servings of fruit or vegetables. Read more

 

Back to 
EAT HEALTHY