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A Granola Bar

Condensed from U.S. News by Dennis Thompson

Because of hidden sugars, research suggests that “people think they’re starting out having a healthy breakfast, but they may be setting themselves up to be hungry all day, and eat too much over the course of a day,” Naomi Mandel, a professor of marketing at Arizona State University said. Be careful when you reach for foods labeled “healthy” –  they may have hidden high levels of sugar and you may snack more later.

Research shows that it’s easier to exercise some self-control over sugar-driven hunger, if you are given fair warning through product packaging. So read those labels

Mandel said she’s particularly concerned about the impact from breakfast foods like cereal, yogurt or instant oatmeal, which are marketed as healthy but often contain loads of sugar. Read more

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Condensed from an article by Dennis Thompson in the Philly Enquirer

Mindfulness has become a billion-dollar industry. Countless practitioners and more than 1,500 smartphone apps promise to help people become calm and focused despite the turbulence surrounding them. It is touted as a cure-all for many modern ills, from stress and pain to depression.

In a new paper, Willoughby Britton, director of Brown University’s clinical and affective neuroscience laboratory. and 14 other experts say it’s time to replace the hype with serious scientific rigor.

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Condensed from an article by Alexandra Sifferlin for Time Health

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the U.S. It’s so common that federal experts say that nearly every sexually active man or woman will be infected with at least one strain at some point in their lives and one of the riskiest strains of HPV known to cause cancer, HPV 16, was six times more common among men than women.

“There was this perception that HPV was a disease among women, and that needs to change,” says study author Ashish Deshmukh, an assistant professor in the department of health services research, management and policy at the University of Florida.

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Condensed from an article by Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

More than 20 percent of young white women who’ve been to a tanning salon become addicted to tanning — even though doing so raises their risk of deadly skin cancer and premature skin aging, a new study reports.

Women who were dependent were more likely to have begun tanning at an earlier age, to be concerned about their appearance and to have depressive symptoms, compared with women who weren’t dependent.

Nearly 47 percent of the women were college students.

He said women need to understand not only the risks of tanning but to be on the lookout for signs of tanning addiction, such as symptoms of depression.

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logo-shanti-montpellier-meditation-relaxationCondensed from Harvard Health Publications

A relaxation response is the opposite of the stress response. It’s a state of profound rest that can be elicited in many ways. With regular practice, you create a well of calm to dip into as the need arises.

Here Are The Four Suggestions:

Breath focus. In this simple, powerful technique, you take long, slow, deep breaths (also known as abdominal or belly breathing). As you breathe, you gently disengage your mind from distracting thoughts and sensations. This technique may not be appropriate for those with health problems that make breathing difficult, such as respiratory ailments or heart failure.

Body scan. This technique blends breath focus with progressive muscle relaxation. After a few minutes of deep breathing, you focus on one part of the body or group of muscles at a time and mentally releasing any physical tension you feel there.

Guided imagery. For this technique, you conjure up soothing scenes, places, or experiences in your mind to help you relax and focus. You can find free apps and online recordings of calming scenes—just make sure to choose imagery you find soothing and that has personal significance.

Mindfulness meditation. This practice involves sitting comfortably, focusing on your breathing, and bringing your mind’s attention to the present moment without drifting into concerns about the past or the future. Read more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Condensed from US News by Alan Mozes

About six in 10 sexually active single men in the United States are taking responsibility for birth control, government health officials say. When they have sex, these unmarried males are using a condom (45 percent), vasectomy, “withdrawal,” or a combination, according to a new report released Thursday from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For the study, the researchers surveyed about 3,700 unmarried and sexually active men, aged 15 to 44. Read more: 

screen-shot-2017-09-17-at-3-51-55-pmA new  University of Colorado School of Medicine study estimates thousands of U.S. lives could be saved if mammograms were done every year from age 40 to 84.

A computer modeling to assess the three major mammogram recommendations was done: annual screening from age 40 to 84; annual screening at ages 45 to 54, then every other year from 55 to 79; or every other year from 50 to 74.

Study co-author R. Edward Hendrick says, “We know that screening mammography saves lives, what’s still a mystery is how many breast cancer deaths are averted by screening mammography and appropriate treatment.”

The researchers estimated how many lives would be saved if every U.S. woman born in 1960 followed one of the three above recommendations each year.

Deaths from breast cancer would fall by an average of 40 percent with annual screenings from 40 to 84, the investigators reported.

By comparison, breast cancer mortality would decline 31 percent with screening until age 79. And it would drop 23 percent with every-other-year mammography from 50 to 74, which is recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

The number of lives saved from breast cancer would be about 29,400 with annual screening from age 40 to 84; and about 22,800 and 17,200, respectively, for the other two recommendations, the researchers found.

Currently, only about half of women over 40 get mammogram screening at least once every two years, even though one in eight is expected to develop breast cancer in their lives, Hendrick said.

Of course, false positive results that require additional and unnecessary screening remain a concern. But, according to Hendrick, “the average woman in her 40s getting annual screening can expect this to occur about once every 12 years.”

As usual, there is still controversy from these findings. Chec with your health professional to determine your next steps, according to your individual family health history. Your guidelines may even be earlier than 40.


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